Crane Inspections

Inspections are required by OSHA on all cranes and rigging equipment to assure the assembly of the crane is done per manufactures guidelines.

Mobile Crane

Mobile Crane InspectionsAnnual

Annual /Comprehensive inspections are required by OSHA for all mobile equipment over 2000 lbs. and that fall in the description of equipment that can move or hoist loads horizontally or vertically by means of hook or winch. The inspection consists of a thorough examination from the ground up, examining carriers, undercarriages and the car-body. In addition, the upper works for gears, shafts, and control mechanism including the operator station are inspected. The entire boom structure, sheaves, shafts, drums and hoist ropes and pendant support systems.

Post Assembly

Post assemblies are required by OSHA to assure that the assembly of the crane and attachments are done per the manufactures guidelines. The inspection would include connection points and retaining pins, condition of the equipment components, couplers shafts pendant assembly, reeving of boom hoists and blocks. Support bridles, jibs, and luffing booms, any attachment packages that change the basic configuration of the equipment.

Post Incident

Should the unfortunate event occur when a machine fails structural or from a stability issue our job is to gain control of the site and to stabilize the situation for prevention of secondary incidents which can occur due to damaged crane structures that still have not completely failed which is quite commonly the case. Once the safety of the situation is under control a through follow on investigation takes place through interviews of the parties involved, witness accounts, and an intensive forensic study as to the cause, the why and what preventative measures can be taken to eliminate similar events.

Tower Crane

Tower CraneAnnual

Tower cranes are required to have an annual inspection under OSHA law. Prior to the relatively new CFR 1926.1400 crane and derrick standard, released in November of 2010, inspections were performed under the guidance and outlines in the ASME B30.3 document. Today’s requirements include both documents to be followed. Under both, a “pre-inspection” is required to examine components after transportation and handling, followed by a post erection assembly where the equipment is reexamined and specific requirements for issuing an annual inspection require: slewing ring bolts and assemblies, the final assembly of the crane, foundation engineering and control functions such as limit switches two-block systems, trolley travel, hoist brakes and load testing.

Post Assembly

Quite often the primary purpose of a post assembly is to have a “3rd party” objective inspection which assures the client that the crane has been examined and assembly is correct and all control systems are in order and quite frankly, the same items reviewed under an annual inspection, save for the slewing ring examination, would be performed.

Post Incident

Should the unfortunate event occur when a machine fails structurally or from a stability issue our job is to gain control of the site and to stabilize the situation for prevention of secondary incidents which can occur due to damaged crane structures that still have not completely failed which is quite commonly the case. Once the safety of the situation is under control a through follow on investigation takes place through interviews of the parties involved, witness accounts, and an intensive forensic study as to the cause, the why and what preventative measures can be taken to eliminate similar events.

Overhead Crane

Overhead cranes are required to have a periodic (annual) inspection as well as daily and monthly. Depending on severity of service and environments in General Industry operations, could require comprehensive inspections to be performed on a periodic inspection level, frequently, due to many variables in the general industries such as; multiple shift work, caustic, or hot work environments e.t.c. Typically we follow OSHA 1910.179 and ASME B 30.2 guidelines and standards to perform these types of inspections.

Equipment

Equipment: There is a myriad of equipment we all use on projects today. The need for training and meeting the regulations in today’s market is a major impact on your company’s bottom line. Dealing with insurance requirements and staying current on regulatory influences requires reaching outside of a firm’s resources to provide a comprehensive program.

Aerial Lifts

Aerial personnel platforms; scissor lifts, aerial boom lifts, mast climbing work platforms, and swing stage scaffolding. Aerial lifts require specific training in safety, operations, inspections, manufacture requirements and the Federal regulations regarding each type.

Spyder CraneSpyder Cranes

Relatively new to the industry, this specific hoisting machine fully meets the description of a “crane” under CFR OSHA 1926.1400. Yet its applications, are endless due to the compact nature and maneuverability based on compact design which gives the end user hoisting ability in areas where hand operated hoists were the only tool available. But along with the benefits comes the necessity of proper training and use of this equipment. Especially the unique hazards involved when using these machines in restricted spaces and due to close working proximity to other contractors and personnel. Most trades and crafts will find an application for these cranes in the scope of work they perform. When they do, the crane requirements must be met.

Mechanic Trucks

Service trucks; basically, these were designed with the equipment mechanic in mind when doing repair type work. The trend we see today, is for companies utilizing this equipment to assist in construction activities. In doing so, this equipment falls under the crane standard. Thus, the training and certification requirements must be met when this equipment is used in such a manner and fits the description of a crane under OSHA rule.